Protestant Theological Faculty of the Charles University invites you to the

Sociology and Social Work in Post–Secular Societies

7th International Conference on Sociology and Social Work

September 7–8, 2017

in Masarykova kolej Congress Centre, Thákurova 1, 160 00 Praha 6

Secularism was one of the main devices of modernity. Social work has historically been rooted in religious norms and values. In the recent years it has developed as a professional qualification committed to the respect for liberal civic rights. By the end of the last century social scientists had identified that the global world is far from being secular. Also in Western societies religions have persisted and form today a visible part of private and public lives even when in non–traditional and transformed patterns.

In today’s world — rich on collisions and unsolved social problems related also to liberal market economies, war conflicts, inequality and mass migration in global terms — the (sociological) question arises regarding the positive and negative implications of such developments for the place of social work in society, and whether churches and faiths can contribute to social problem solving, creating communities and broad social integration which form the main agenda of social work.

While this will provide the connecting theme for the conference, the specific thematic sections will facilitate a diverse consideration of this and other streams of sociological and social work interest.


The program includes three keynote addresses by invited speakers focused on the theme — the role of sociology and social work in the post–secular world.

Professor Walter A. Lorenz, Free University of Bozen, Italy

Professor Grace Davie, professor emeritus, Sociology, University of Exeter, UK

Dr. André Mulder, Practical Theology, University of Applied Sciences Windesheim, The Netherlands


Conference sections:

  1. Integration and coexistence in diverse and fragmented societies.
  2. Tradition and Innovation in Social Work. Social work past and present as a sociologically “modern” enterprise.
  3. Secular and religious values in social work. Religious and non–religious spiritualities as resources of resilience?
  4. Creating sustainable communities — integrative and innovative approaches.
  5. Sociological futures for social work? The future of social work in sociological perspective.

If you consider taking part at the conference, please, check the Call for papers and the Registration form.